Numbers don’t lie, Giants are a dynasty

Are the San Francisco Giants a dynasty? Well, if you consider three World Series championships in five years a dynasty – especially in today’s multi-tiered playoff format – then the answer is a resounding yes.

The Giants, who have now won the World Series in alternating years (2010-2012-2014) are just the third team to win three titles in a five-season span since MLB began playoff baseball in 1969. The New York Yankees won three in a row between 1998-2000, and four in five years with their 1996 flag. And the Oakland A’s took three straight World Series beginning in 1972.

The Yankees boast the three greatest dynasties in baseball history. They won a record five straight World Series from 1949-53, and seven in 10 years 12 years if you count the 1947 and 1956 champs. And the Bronx Bombers won four straight World Series from 1936-39, and six in eight years including titles in 1941 and 1943.

Since the first World Series in 1903, only nine teams have managed to win three times in five years. The other dynasties are the Philadelphia A’s who won three out of four (1910-1911-1913), the Boston Red Sox, four out of seven (1912-1915-1916-1918), the St. Louis Cardinals, three out of five in alternating years (1942-1944-1946), and the Yankees, three out of five (1958-1961-1962.)

Seven other ballclubs have won consecutive World Series,but none of them was able to win a third championship in five years. The other repeat champions are the Chicago Cubs (1907-1908), New York Giants (1921-1922), Yankees (1927-1928), Philadelphia A’s (1929-1930), Cincinnati Reds (1975-1976), Yankees (1977-1978) and the Toronto Blue Jays (1992-1993).

The New York/San Francisco Giants have now won eight World Series, tied with the Red Sox for fourth on the all time rings list. The Yankees lead with 27 championships, followed by the Cardinals with 11 and the Philadelphia/Kansas City/Oakland A’s with nine. Overall the Yankees have played in the most World Series (27-13 record), followed by the Giants (8-12 record).


My 10 most personal Derek Jeter moments

DSCN2510OK, I wasn’t there for the flip play, or Mr. November, or the time he dove into the stands that night at the Stadium against Boston. But I’ve had my moments up close and personal with Derek Jeter. Here are my 10 all-time favorites from games that I attended….and other, shall we say, close encounters or experiences.

1. 2009 – The Catch: This one is easy. In May of 2009, my first game at the new Yankee Stadium, I caught a Jeter home run in the left field stands. Granted it was batting practice, but who’s counting. I’ve attended hundreds of major league baseball games, but this was the only time in my life I ever caught a ball. Later that night, Jeter hit a home run during the “real” game, and the Yankees rallied with three runs in the ninth inning to beat the Twins 5-4. Here’s my story

2. 2000 – Jenna in the News: Next week my daughter Jenna will make headlines. She’s getting married. But Jenna made headlines back in 2000 at the Yankees victory parade down Broadway. She was quoted in the Daily News, talking about her favorite Yankee. “I blew him a kiss, he blew a kiss at me, I blew it right back at him,” gushed Jenna Bause, 19, a freshman at Dutchess Community College. “It’s in my heart forever.” No, she’s not marrying DJ, but Sam, her husband to be, is a Yankee fan. And that counts for a lot.

3. 1999 – World Champions: Jeter singles to key a three-run fourth inning as the Yankees sweep the Atlanta Braves to win their 25h World Series in the final game of the 20th Century.

4. 1996 – The Rookie: The Yankees then 22-year-old shortstop lines a single up the middle with two outs and the bases loaded in the bottom of the 11th for a wild 12-11 win against the Red Sox.

5. 2003 – Curses: Jeter’s leadoff double in the eighth sparks a three-run, game-tying rally by the Yankees against Boston ace Pedro Martinez in Game 7 of the ALCS. The Yanks would go on to win the pennant in the 11th on a home run by Aaron Boone.

6. 1998 – Perfect: David Wells pitches a perfect game and DJ is perfect too, singling and catching a pop-up in his only chance in the  field. 

7. 2001 –  Mets Killer I: The captain has two hits, including an RBI single in first, and the Yankees beat the Mets at Shea Stadium in the first meeting of Gotham’s rivals since the Subway Series.

8. 2003 – Mets Killer II: In the nightcap of a day-night, two-ballpark doubleheader, Alfonso Soriano and Jeter lead off the game with back-to-back home runs and the Yanks go on to beat the Mets 9-8.

9. 2013 – Captain to Captain: Friends of mine have met Derek Jeter, bought him a Crown Royal and Coke, gotten an autograph. My closest Yankee captain experience was meeting Don Mattingly, his predecessor, for a photo opportunity near my Hopewell Junction home last year. Guess what, we talked about Jeter. Donnie Baseball is a big Jeter fab.

10. 2013 – Mr. Consistency: Coming off a broken ankle suffered in a playoff game the previous October, Jeter plays in just 17 games in 2013. I went to two Yankee games in 2013, and the captain played in both. I’ve seen dozens and dozens of Yankee games in the past 20 years….and Derek Jeter played in every one.


No-hitters against the Yankees a rare event

Fifty-six years ago today, September 20, 1958, the Yankees were no-hit by knuckleballer Hoyt Wilhelm. And discounting Houston’s six-pitcher no-hitter against New York in 2003, the Yankees haven’t been no-hit since – although they came close on numerous occasions.

Eight times since the Wilhelm gem the Yankees have entered the ninth inning without a hit. And each time they managed to break up a no-hitter in their last at bat.

In 1967, on Opening Day at Yankee Stadium, Boston left-hander Billy Rohr took a no-hitter into the ninth inning against Hall of Famer Whitey Ford. Rohr was one strike away from history when Elston Howard hit a soft single into right-center field. Rohr beat the Yankees in his next start, but won just one more game in the majors after that.

In the space of one month in 1970, Yankee second baseman Horace Clarke broke up three possible no-hitters in the ninth. Jim Rooker of Kansas City, Sonny Siebert of Boston and Joe Niekro of Detroit were the victims.

Reggie Jackson broke up a Nolan Ryan no-hit bid in 1979 with a one-out single against the Angels’ Hall of Famer. Two years later, Rick Cerone turned the trick against Boston’s Bobby Ojeda. And in 1989, Roberto Kelly ruined Dave Stieb’s perfect game by doubling to left with two outs in the ninth. Kelly then scored on a single by Steve Sax, but Stieb got Luis Polonia to ground out and preserve his 2-1 victory. The last near-miss occurred in 2006, when Robinson Cano hit a line single to left against Baltimore’s Daniel Cabrera with one out in the ninth to break up the no-hitter. Cano was then erased when Bobby Abreu hit into a double play to end the game.

Wilhelm No-No

Wilhelm’s no-hitter took place at the old Baltimore Memorial Stadium. Orioles catcher Gus Triandos accounted for the only run of the game with a home run in the seventh inning against Yankee reliever Bobby Shantz, who was pitching in relief of Dan Larsen. Less than two years earlier, Larsen threw the only no-hitter in World Series history as New York beat the Brooklyn Dodgers 2-0.

A total of six Hall of Famers played in the Wilhelm game, Mickey Mantle and pinch-hitters Yogi Berra and Enos Slaughter for the Yankees, and Brooks Robinson, Dick Williams (who made it as a manager) and Hoyt Wilhelm for the Orioles.

Houston’s Posse

Wilhelm was just 3-10 in 1958, splitting the season between Cleveland and the Orioles. He started four games that year, and just 52 in his entire career.

The Astros six-man no-hitter took place on June 11, 2003. Roy Oswalt started for Houston but was injured early in the contest. Pete Munron, Kirk Saarloos, Brad Lidge, Octavio Dotel and Billy Wagner finished the task. 

It was the most pitchers ever to combine on a no-hitter in major league history — twice, four had done the trick. And it was the first time in 6,981 games — the longest streak in major league history – that the Yankees had been no-hit. Between those no-hitter, the Yankees won nine World Series and 15 American League pennants.


Still the Juan: Best never to win Cy Young

Nolan Ryan, baseball’s all-time strikeout king, never won a Cy Young Award. Nor did Don Sutton, a fellow Hall of Famer and 300-game winner. Hall of Famers Bert Blyleven, Jim Bunning, Phil Niekro or Robin Roberts? Answer is no. Not even Mariano Rivera, the greatest closer in baseball history, could cop the Cy.

It’s not any of  those guys. The greatest pitcher never to win a Cy Young Award is Juan Marichal, the Dominican Dandy. He’s the Juan, the best player never to win pitching’s highest honor.

Marichal was 243-142, a .631 winning percentage and a 3.04 ERA during his Hall of Fame career, spent almost entirely with the San Francisco Giants. He won 20 games six times, and three of those were dominant performances, Cy Young type seasons almost any other year.

However Marchial had the bad luck to run up against even more superb performances by Sandy Koufax in 1963 and 1966, and then Bob Gibson in 1968.

In 1963, Juan Marichal was 25-8 with a 2.41 ERA and 248 strikeouts. One of those wins was an epic 1-0, 16-inning battle by the bay against Warren Spahn, in which both pitchers had complete games. But Sandy Koufax was even better, 25-5, 1.88 ERA and 306 strikeouts. Koufax was also the National League MVP that year.

Three years later, Marichal went 25-6, .2.23 ERA and 222 strikeouts. Again he was bested by Koufax, who in his final season was 27-9, 1.73 ERA and 317 strikeouts. From its inception in 1956 until 1967, only one Cy Young was awarded each season. Koufax won it three times – in 1963, 1965 and 1966.

In 1968, Marichal was a career high 26-9, 2.43 ERA and 218 K’s. This time he ran up against Bob Gibson and his 1.12 ERA, the lowest in baseball since Dutch Leonard’s 0.96 in 1914. No pitcher has come close to that mark since. Gibson was 22-9 that year and struck out 268 batters in winning both the Cy and MVP. Marichal was left behind at the altar once again.

Imagine that,winning 25, 25 an 26 games – and losing the Cy Young each time. Marichal failed to garner a single vote in 1963, 1966 or 1968 – Koufax twice and Gibson were unanimous winners.

Marichal also won 20 games in 1964, 1965 and 1969 – and yet did not get as much as a single first place vote in Cy Young balloting any of those years, or in any of the other years he was eligible.  Marichal’s highest finish was eighth, tied with Bill Stoneman, in 1971, when he was 18-11.


These Yankees are offensively challenged

To say the Yankees are offensively challenged is a gross understatement. Going into action today, the Bronx formerly known as Bombers were next to last in runs scored in the American League (ahead of only the Red Sox.)

The pitching is not the problem. Despite losing 80 percent of their starting rotation for all or most of the season, the Yankee pitching has been consistent. The bullpen, led by David Robertson and Dellin Betances, has, in fact ,been outstanding.

It’s the Yankee offense that bears scrutiny. Only Brett Gardner, who has been their best player in 2014, is hitting above his lifetime average. It’s easy to point the finger at a starting lineup which is hitting a collective .491 points below their lifetime batting averages. Here’s the ugly truth:

Pos. Player                                    2014   Career   Difference

LF   Brett Gardner                .276   .269        +7

SS   Derek Jeter                     .273    .311         -38

CF   Jacoby Ellsbury             .273    .294       -21

IB     Mark Teixeira                .232    .275       -43

DH    Carlos Beltran               .240    .281       -41

C      Brian McCann                 .238    .274       -36

3B     Chase Headley              .250     .265       -15

2B     Stephen Drew                .170    .259       – 89

RF     Martin Prado                 .163    .289       -126

RF     Ichiro Suzuki                  .277    .317       -40

RF     Alfonso Soriano            .221    .270       -49

Some random thoughts, rants and muses on the hitless wonders:

  • Texeira’s batting average has dipped each year since he joined the Yankees in 2009.
  • Free agent acquisitions Ellsbury, Beltran and McCann (or is that McCan’t?, pictured above in case you were wondering) have hit a cumulative 98 points behind their lifetime averages.
  • Amazingly, Drew is hitting lower with the Yankees (.170) than the Red Sox (.176).
  • Discount relative newcomers Headley, Prado and Drew, the cumulative mark is still .261 under the lifetime mean.
  • And we haven’t included utility men Brian Roberts (.237, .276, -39) and Kelly Johnson (.219, .251, -32). That brings the cumulative total below lifetime batting average to -.562
  • Don’t forget these are current lifetime averages.If you counted those averages coming into the season, the dropoff would be even more precipitous.
  • Jeter gets a pass. He’s played exactly one game in his career when the Yankees were mathematically eliminated. Plus he’s a 40-year-old shortstop.
  • Yankees haven’t finished below .500 since 76-86 in 1992, 20 games behind the world champion Blue Jays. Since then they’ve captured five World Series and seven AL pennants while winning 14 divisional titles.

10 highly unlikely batting champions

Some may argue OBP or even OPS, but batting average is the true test of the best hitter.

Here are baseballs 10 most unlikely batting champs:

1. Norm Cash, Tigers, 1961, .361 – Cash never came within 75 points of his magical season, and finished with a career .271 BA. His 41 homers and 132 RBIs that year were overshadowed by the great Maris-Mantle home run chase.

2. Snuffy Stirnweiss, Yankees, 1945, .309 – A second baseman with a .268 lifetime average, Stirnweiss won the AL batting title in the final year of World War II while many stars were still in the service.

3. Michael Cuddyer, Rockies, 2014, .331 – Cuddyer never hit higher than .284 until his breakout season last year, 53 points above his lifetime .278 average.

4. George Stone, Browns, 1906, .358 – Stone played just seven seasons, six with the Browns, yet managed to win an AL batting title. Ty Cobb would go on to win 11 of the next 13.

5. Debs Garms, Pirates, 1940, .355 – A singles hitter, Garms had a career year with Pittsburgh. He batted .293 lifetime with just 17 home runs.

6. Ferris Fain, A’s, 1951, .344; 1952, .327 – Fain, a journeyman first baseman who played nine years with four AL teams, won back-to-back batting titles for Philadelphia. He wound up a .290 career hitter.

7. Bubbles Hargrave, Reds, 1926, .353 – Bubbles, whose real name was Eugene, broke a run of six straight batting titles by the great Rogers Hornsby, who hit .400 three times in four years before Hargrave stole his crown.

8. Derrek Lee, Cubs, 2005, .335 – Lee had a career year in 2005 when he led the NL in batting, hits, doubles and slugging percentage. But lifetime he hit just .281.

9. Alex Johnson, Angels, 1970, .329 – Johnson played for eight teams during a 13-year career and hit .288 lifetime, yet edged out Carl Yastrzemski to win a batting title.

10. Carl Yastrzemski, Red Sox, 1968, .301 – Yaz is a Hall of Famer who won three batting titles. But he managed to win one of them with the lowest average for a batting champion in baseball history.


Dan Brouthers — baseball’s first great slugger

IMG_0908Scoping out the village of Wappingers Falls the other day when I stumbled upon this plaque in the center of town, right near the waterfalls in front of a bicycle shop. Turns out Dan Brouthers, a native of Dutchess County, was quite a ballplayer.

Brouthers was born in Sylvan Lake, NY, in 1858. As a teen-ager he played for the semi-pro Actives in Wappingers Falls before making his professional debut  in 1879 with the Troy Trojans.

A big man by the standards of the time (6-2, 207), he  was known as the first great slugger in baseball history. “Big Dan” held the career record for home runs from 1887 to 1889 and hit 106 home runs, fourth highest total of any 19th Century player.

A left-hand hitting first baseman, he had a career slugging percentage of .519, which remained a major league record until Ty Cobb moved ahead in 1922. When Brouthers retired, he ranked second with 205 triples and third in RBIs (1,296) and hits (2,296).

Brouthers played for a variety of teams throughout a 19-year career that spanned four decades, including the Buffalo Bisons, Detroit Wolverines, Brooklyn Grooms and Boston Beaneaters, all of the National League.

He earned five batting titles, and his lifetime average of .342 ranks ninth on the all-time list, tied with another great slugger, guy named Babe Ruth.

John McGraw, the long-time manager of the New York Giants, once said: “Brouthers really was a great hitter, one of the most powerful batters of all time. ‘Big Dan’ in his prime, against the present-day pitching and the modern lively ball, would have hit as many home runs as anybody. I don’t think I ever saw a longer hitter.”

Brouthers retired in 1896, but returned eight years later in 1904 to play two games for the Giants. He is one of 29 players in MLB history whose career spanned four decades.

At the age of 46, he played for Poughkeepsie and led the Hudson River League in batting with a .373 average. He spent nearly 20 years working with the Giants, and was in charge of the Polo Grounds press gate.

Brouthers died in 1932, and is buried at St. Mary’s Cemetery in Wappingers Falls. Dan Brouthers was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame by the Veteran’s Committee in 1945. The Society for American Baseball Research (SABR) ranks him as the ninth greatest player of the 19th Century.

Related blog: Be sure to read about another great Dutchess County baseball player, Hall of Famer Eddie Collins of Millerton.


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