Dead man drafted in FLAKS fantasy baseball

Picture 056Do you do fantasy baseball?

I play in a 16-team league called FLAKS (Fantasy League All-Stars, Kontenders and Slackards) which this year is celebrating its 24th season. FLAKS is made up primarily of communications professionals. Many of us are former journalists who worked together at IBM at certain points. In the early years, before the Internet, we literally kept our own stats. Now every pitch is recorded.

Many years back FLAKS became an auction league. Each year, shortly before Opening Day, we gather together to draft our teams. Do the math. 16 teams, 25 players per team, that’s 400 players. And we bid on every player, one player at a time, one dollar at a time.

The draft normally takes up the better part of 12 hours. This year, for the first time, a dead man, the former Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura, was drafted. And we had an epic bidding war for Kris Bryant of the Cubs, which wound up in a league record $60 price.

Following the draft, CBS Sports evaluates our draft. My team, SportsLifer, received a D this year, but fear not. Those grades are based on a snake draft, not auction. Last year CBS gave me an A, and yet a week into the season SportsLifer was in the basement. Eventually, after a series of trades and pick-ups, we managed to climb into a tie for seventh place and finished in the money.

This is my 2017 squad. Although not a superstar-studded roster, it appears to be a well-balanced squad. And it will evolve over the course of the season, one week a time. We’ll see what happens.

SPORTSLIFER 2017

C — Gary Sanchez, NYY

1B –- Eric Hosmer, KC

2B — Jonathan Schoop, Bal

SS – Jonathan Villar, Mil

3B – Nick Castellanos, Det

OF – Dexter Fowler, StL

OF – Adam Jones, Bal

OF – Hunter Pence, SF

DH – Brandon Moss, KC (1B, OF)

RESERVES

1B – Josh Bell, Pitt

OF – Howie Kendrick, Phil

OF – Nick Markakis, Atl

OF — Tyler Naquin, Cle

OF – Josh Reddick, Hous

PITCHING

SP – Gerrit Cole, Pitt

SP – Johnny Cueto, SF

SP – JA Happ, Tor

SP — Rick Porcello, Bos

SP – Blake Snell, TB

RP – Mark Melancon, SF

RP – Jim Johnson, Atl

RESERVES

SP – Brandon Finnegan, Cin

SP – Mike Montgomery, Cubs

DL – Didi Gregorius, SS, NYY; Collin McHugh, SP, Hou


Jesuit All-Stars: A team for the ages

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It was a battle for Jesuit supremacy when Marquette and Xavier met in the West Regional Final of the NCAAs last week. Marquette and Xavier are two of the 28 Jesuit universities in the United States, many of whom boast a proud and rich basketball heritage.

Jesuit schools have fared well in the tournament, winning six championships since the NCAAs began in 1939. In fact, five of the previous six Jesuit entrants in the Final Four wound up winning titles. The University of San Francisco, centered by Bill Russell, above, took back-to-back championships in 1955 and 1956. Holy Cross won in 1947, Loyola of Chicago in 1963, Marquette in 1977 and Georgetown in 1984. Santa Clara made the tournament in 1952, but failed to reach the finals.

Gonzaga became the seventh Jesuit Final Four entry by beating Xavier, and could become the first Jesuit school to win the championship in 23 years.

The list of outstanding Jesuit college basketball players, many of whom went on to win the NCAAs, would stack up well against any competition.

All-Time Jesuit All-Star Five:

C – Bill Russell, San Francisco

F – Patrick Ewing, Georgetown

F – Elgin Baylor, Seatle

G – Bob Cousy, Holy Cross

G – John Stockton, Gonzaga

Jesuit Reserves:

C – Alonzo Mourning, Georgetown

C – Dikembe Mutombo, Georgetown

F – Tommy Heinsohn, Holy Cross

F – Maurice Lucas, Marquette

F – David West, Xavier

G – Allen Iverson, Georgetown

G – KC Jones, San Francisco

G – Dwayne Wade, Marquette

G – Sleepy Floyd, Georgetown

G – Dana Barros, Boston College


‘Casey Stengel: Baseball’s Greatest Character’ is latest must-read from author Marty Appel

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Marty Appel has hit another home run with his latest undertaking “Casey Stengel: Baseball’s Greatest Character.” Appel, whose credits include “Munson” and “Pinstripe Empire,” the definitive history of the New York Yankees, digs deep into Casey Stengel’s life and uncovers multiple aspects of a life in baseball that spanned more than 50 years.

In 2009, MLB Network ran a series that highlighted many areas of the game. Stengel finished first in a category called “Characters of the Game.” He beat out luminaries such as Yogi Berra, Babe Ruth, Dizzy Dean, Leo Durocher and Satchel Paige.

Upon Casey’s death in 1975, Richie Ashburn, who played for Stengel with the original Mets, said: “He was the happiest man I’ve ever seen.”

Casey loved the writers who covered his teams – ‘my writers’ he would call them. He was a showboat and a rabble-rouser who wasn’t afraid to mix it up in a fight. He was a .284 hitter as a player, and managed the Dodgers, Braves, Yankees and Mets, achieving his greatest fame with the Yankees who won five straight World Championships between 1949 and 1953.

Here are 10 amazing factoids and associated Stengelese witticisms found in Casey’s bio:

1. Casey hit the first home run in Ebbets Field when the Brooklyn Superbas (soon to be called Dodgers) christened their new park with an exhibition game against the Yankees before the 1913 Series. Generous scoring ruled Stengel’s inside-the-park blast a home run.

2. A decade later, in 1923 Stengel hit the first World Series home run in the history of Yankee Stadium. This was also an inside-the-parker, and gave the New York Giants a 5-4 win over the Yankees. Stengel also homered in Game 3, and this blast into the right field seats gave the Giants a 1-0 win.

3. In 1933, Casey served as a pall bearer at the funeral of legendary Giants manager John McGraw. Other pall bearers that day included George M. Cohan, DeWolf Hopper (who wrote ‘Casey at the Bat’’), Yankee owner Jacob Ruppert, Dodgers manager Wilbert Robinson, Will Rogers, and football Giants owner Tim Mara.

4. One year, Stengel managed the Boston Braves to a sixth place finish, coming on the heels of four seventh place finishes. Early in the 1943 season Casey was hit by a taxi cab in Kenmore Square and broke his left leg. Acerbic Boston Record columnist Dave ‘The Colonel’ Egan wrote that “the taxi driver who knocked Stengel down and put him out of commission until July” should be voted the man who did the most for Boston baseball in 1943.

5. Before the first game of the 1952 World Series, Stengel, then manager of the Yankees, took Mickey Mantle out to right field in Ebbets Field to give him a tutorial on the angles of the concrete wall. Mantle looked at Casey as though he was screwy. “Guess he thinks I was born at age 50 and started managing immediately,” said Stengel.

6. “The secret of managing is to keep the five guys who hate you caseyaway from the guys who are undecided.” – Casey Stengel

7. After guiding the Yankees to 10 American League pennants in 12 years, Stengel was let go by the team after losing to the Pirates in a thrilling seven-game World Series in 1960. “I’ll never make the mistake of being 70 again,” Casey said.

8. In 1962, Casey took over the reigns of the expansionist New York Mets. The Mets were lovable losers (they lost 120 games in the inaugural season), but Stengel quickly made them popular. Take for instance Marvin Eugene Throneberry (whose initials were MET). In the first inning of a June game against the Cubs, Marvelous Marv steamed into third base with a triple. However he was called out when the umpire ruled he missed second base. When Casey came out to argue, the ump, Dusty Boggess, said, “Don’t bother Casey, he missed first base too.”

9. Casey invented his own form of speaking, called Stengelese. One of his favorite sayings was “Most people my age are dead at the present time.”

10. Just days before he passed away in the hospital at the age of 85, Casey decided to rise from his hand, stand barefoot in his hospital gown, and put his hand over his heart as the national anthem was played. Near his gravesite is a plaque that reads: “There comes a time in every man’s life and I’ve had plenty of them.”


The Doc, the Giants and a breath of fresh air

Doc & Dad

Dr. John McGovern, right, and Bruno Benziger celebrate their 50th birthday in 1975.

Last week, the White Plains community bid a fond farewell as we celebrated the life of Dr. John V. McGovern. The Doc was truly a Renaissance man and a charter member of “The Greatest Generation,” the group of Americans that grew up during the Great Depression and fought in World War II.

Dr. McGovern specialized in allergies and immunology, enjoyed singing show tunes and was a licensed pilot who appreciated the fine arts and the opera. Oh yeah, and he also fathered 13 children.

He was a role model for me, like my father, and Bruno Benziger, our Boy Scout troop leader, my uncles Tom and Jimmy, and so many of the men of the previous generation who taught us life lessons and showed us the way, Growing up in White Plains in the 50s and 60s was simply amazing. Those were the days.

I remember the Doc as a healer. When I was a third grader he began treating me for asthma. Weekly shots became bi-monthly, but when I went away to college, the treatments ended.

Dr. McGovern set me on the road to recovery. Along with Dr. John Parrinello, another allergist who treated me in middle age, I eventually grew out of my asthma. .

As a sixth grader back in 1962, I was having particular difficulty breathing. Anyone who has ever suffered with asthma, knows that wheezing feeling, where every breath is painful.

One gray November Sunday, the asthma was squeezing the air out of my lungs. My mother and father wanted to call Dr. McGovern, but I knew he was at the Giants game at Yankee Stadium. In those days, doctors could be paged at sporting events. And they made house calls.

I begged my parents not to call, and they waited until the game ended. The Doc arrived at the house shortly after. He took out his stethoscope, listened to my lungs, and said “this boy has pneumonia. He needs to go to the hospital.”

Shortly after I was admitted to St. Agnes Hospital in White Plains, where I stayed for six days. I recovered, and to this day, nearly 55 years later, knock on wood, I’ve never been hospitalized again.

Oh, by the way, the Giants beat the St. Louis Cardinals 31-28 on that November Sunday in 1962.  That one was for you Doc. Thanks for curing me.


4 OTs: Knicks take losing to the next extreme

The Knicks, who have found strange and unusual ways to lose basketball games during a prolonged January slump, have taken defeat to a new extreme. Overtime. Make that quadruple overtime.

The final score of the Knicks longest game in more than 66 years was Atlanta 142, New York 139. It was their longest game since January 23, 1951, when the Knicks lost 102-92 to the Rochester Royals in another four OT thriller.

In that game at the Rochester Arena, Arnie Risen scored 26 points and Bob Davies 25 to pace the Royals (now the Sacramento Kings). Vince Boryla scored 24 points and Max Zaslofsky 19 for the Knicks. Photo above depicts Knicks-Royals action from a 1951 tilt.

Less than three weeks before the quadruple overtime win over the Knicks, the Royals played an NBA record six-overtime game against the Indianapolis Olympians. The Royals won that game too, 75-73.

1951 proved to be a landmark year for the Royals. The franchise won its only championship, beating the Knicks in 7 games in the NBA Finals. The Royals took a 3-0 lead in the finals, lost the next three, then prevailed 79-75 in Game 7.

RELATED BLOG: A short championship history of the Knicks


10 reasons why the Knicks will never win

 

While James Dolan and Phil Jackson laugh, the Knicks burn

1. James Dolan — Born silver spoon in hand as heir to a Cablevision fortune, he has run the Knicks into the ground with a rash of poor personnel decisions. A recent Sports Illustrated poll named Dolan the worst owner in the NBA. The Knicks problems start at the top.

2. Phil Jackson — He won 11 rings as a coach and two more (ironically with the Knicks) as a player, but he’s been a dismal flop as president of the Knicks. Instead of stepping up as a leader and addressing the situation, Jackson left coach Jeff Hornacek to clean up the Derrick Rose mess. And the list goes on, from the hiring of ill-equipped coach Derrick Fisher, to his insistence on running the old-fashioned triangle offense to his signing of injury-prone Yannick Noah to a four-year, $72 million contract. Jackson has tarnished his legend.

3. Leadership — It starts at the top. See No. 1 James Dolan, No. 2 Phil Jackson and No. 5 Carmelo Anthony. What leadership?

4. Accountability — Without leadership, there is no accountability. Derrick Rose goes AWOL, leaves the team in limbo, and then returns to a slap on the wrist. Heck, he’d didn’t even get suspended. In fact, he’s still starting.

5. Carmelo Anthony — Leaders make those around them better players. Not the case with Carmelo, the so-called face of the Knicks. Carmelo is a great scorer, but he’s all about Carmelo.

6. Derrick Rose — Work Rule #1. If you’re not gonna be there, if you can’t make it to work that day, tell the boss. Derrick Rose had time to run off and catch a flight to Chicago, but didn’t have time to call or text the Knicks to tell them he would miss the New Orleans game. See No. 4, accountability.

7. Teaching –He’s the crown jewel of the franchise. Knick fans are pinning their hopes on Kristaps Porzingis. And yet, how’s he going to become a better basketball player if the follows the tone of the current Knicks. Who’s going to teach him low-post presence and how to play defense. There are no mentors in sight.

8. Culture — There’s a toxic atmosphere in the Knicks front office. Who can forget Isiah Thomas and the sexual harassment suit the Knicks settled out of court. The poor decisions, like multiple lottery picks for Eddy Curry. Being hosed by Denver in the Carmelo Anthony trade. See No. 1 James Dolan.

9. MSG — Playing in the world’s most famous arena actually hurts the Knicks. There’s a long list of players who seem to up their game whenever they visit New York. Michael Jordan, Kobie Bryant and Steph Curry are just a few examples. Even average players play better at Madison Square Garden.

10. History — It’s been 44 years since the Knicks won their last championship. I was in college when the Knicks last won. Now I’m on Medicare. And it ain’t happening this year either. A charter member of the NBA, the Knickerbockers have won just two titles in their history.


Giants vs. Packers: Storied playoff history

 

Packers Jim Taylor rumbles in 1962 NFL Championship game at Yankee Stadium.

The Giants-Packers rivalry is one of the most storied in the NFL, dating back to their first meeting in 1928, which New York won 6-0.

Five times the two teams squared off for the NFL championship, with the Packers winning four, including back-to-back victories in 1961 and 1962. Five years ago, the Giants went into Lambeau Field and beat a 15-1 Green Bay squad 37-20. In 2008, the Giants beat the Packers in a 23-20 overtime thriller in frigid Green Bay to win the NFC Championship and a trip to the Super Bowl.

Four of the seven post-season meetings between the two clubs were decided by a touchdown or less. The Pack won the other two via shutouts.

New York and Green Bay have met 60 times including the regular season, with the Pack holding a 32-26-2 advantage. Their most recent meeting occurred last October, when the Packers won 23-16.

Here are thumbnails on their seven playoff meetings:

Dec. 11, 1938 — Giants 23, Packers 17
In a see-saw battle, the Giants rallied to become the first team since the NFL split into two divisions in 1933 to win two NFL championships.

The Giants took a 16-14 halftime lead before Green Bay surged in front in the third quarter on Tiny Engebresten’s 15-yard field goal.

danowskiGiants halfback Hank Soar, who would later become a major league baseball umpire (he was the first base ump when Don Larsen pitched a perfect game in the 1956 World Series), carried the ball five times and caught a pass on the ensuing drive before making a leaping catch from quarterback Ed Danowski, right, for 23 yards and the winning touchdown.

A championship game record crowd of 48,120 witnessed the game at New York’s Polo Grounds. Each member of the Giants teams received $900, while the losing Packers received $700 per man.

Dec. 10, 1939 — Packers 27, Giants 0
Green Bay avenged its loss to New York the previous year with a resounding victory, the first shutout in championship game history.

The Packers took a 7-0 lead in the first half on a 7-yard touchdown pass from Arnie Herber to Milt Gantenbein.

Green Bay then pulled away with 20 points in the second half, which featured a 31-yard touchdown pass from Cecil Isbell to Joe Laws in the third quarter and a 1-yard touchdown run by Ed Jankowski in the final period.

The game was moved from City Stadium in Green Bay and held at the larger Wisconsin State Fair Park in West Allis near Milwaukee. Top tickets were priced at $4.40.

Dec. 17 , 1944 — Packers 14, Giants 7
In a game played in the midst of World War II, Green Bay scored a pair of touchdowns in the second quarter and held on to win the NFL title.

The Packers celebrated a victory that avenged a 24-0 loss to the Giants a month earlier,

Ted Fritsch scored on a 1-yard run and then hauled in a 28-yard touchdown pass from Irv Comp to give Curly Lambeau’s visiting Packers the win.

Ward Cuff scored on a 1-yard plunge in the fourth quarter for the only score for coach Steve Owens and the Giants.

Giants tackle Al Blozis played in the game while on furlough. Six weeks later he was killed in battle by German machine-gun fire. His number 32 was later retired by the Giants.

Dec. 31, 1961 — Packers 37, Giants 0
In the first NFL championship game ever played in Green Bay, the Packers routed the Giants to give coach Vince Lombardi the first of his five NFL titles. A total of 16 Hall of Famers, 11 of them Packers, dressed for the contest.

Paul-HornungThe Packers were led by Paul Hornung, left, who scored a record-tying 19 points with a touchdown, three field goals, and four extra points.

After a scoreless first quarter, Hornung, who finished with 89 yards rushing, ran for a 6-yard touchdown, the first of 24 Packers points in the second quarter. Green Bay’s defense had four interceptions, and the Giants’ offense picked up only six first downs, one by penalty.

Green Bay quarterback Bart Starr passed for three touchdowns, two to tight end Ron Kramer.

Dec. 30, 1962 — Packers 16, Giants 7
With the temperature in the teens and an icy wind estimated at 30 miles an hour or more, Yankee Stadium was an icebox for the players and 64,892 fans. Both teams came out with cleatless, rubber-soled shoes, and the weather put a crimp in the Giants passing attack led by quarterback Y.A. Tittle.

“I remember the first pass Y. A. threw me; it was a simple square out,” said Giants flanker Frank Gifford. “The wind took it, and the ball sailed way over my head. Y. A. was a great, precise passer. One of the Packers, I don’t remember who, turned to me and said, ‘It’s going to be a long day, Frank.’ ”

Green Bay fullback Jim Taylor led all rushers with 85 yards and scored the game’s only offensive touchdown and guard Jerry Kramer kicked three field goals to account for the Packers scoring.

The Giants registered their only touchdown in the third quarter when Jim Collier recovered a blocked punt in the end zone.

New York would go on to lose its third straight championship game — this one to the Chicago Bears — in 1963, before enduring 18 years of playoff futility. The Packers would win the 1965 NFL championship game, and then went on to win the first two Supers Bowls in 1966 and 1967.

Jan. 20, 2008 — Giants 23, Packers 20 (overtime)
In one of the coldest games in NFL history, the Giants beat the Packers in overtime in the NFC Championship game at Lambeau Field in Green Bay. The game-time temperature was -4 with a wind chill of -24

tynes-kicks-jpgFollowing Corey Webster’s interception of a Brett Favre pass early in overtime, Lawrence Tynes, right,  kicked his third field goal of the game from 47 yards out to give the Giants a hard-earned victory.

Green Bay led 10-6 at the half sparked by a 90-yard touchdown pass from Favre to Donald Driver, but the Giants rebounded in the third quarter to take the lead on touchdown runs by Brandon Jacobs and Ahmad Bradshaw.

Mason Crosby’s fourth quarter field goal tied the game 20-20, and Tynes missed a pair of field goals, including one at the gun, before kicking the game-winner.

The Giants advanced to the Super Bowl, where they knocked off the previously unbeaten New England Patriots 17-14 to win their third Super Bowl.

Jan 15, 2012 – Giants 37, Packers 20

Eli Manning passed for 330 yards and three touchdowns, outdueling Aaron Rodgers in a divisional round upset.

Hakeem Nicks caught two touchdowns, including a 66-yarder in the first quarter and a 37-yard Hail Mary pass just before halftime that gave the Giants a 20-10 lead.

Manning hooked up with Mario Manningham on a four-yard TD pass in the third quarter to extend the Giants lead. Brandon Jacobs ran 14 yards for the final New York touchdown in the fourth quarter.

Much like the last time, the Giants went on to beat the Patriots 21-17 in the Super Bowl.

And once again, Manning and Rodgers will match up as quarterbacks.