Eddie Price, last Giant to win NFL rushing title

Eddie_Price_-_1952_Bowman_LargeIf Penn State’s Saquon Barkley, the #2 pick in the NFL draft, lives up to expectations, he may accomplish something no New York Giant has done in 67 years – win an NFL rushing title.

That’s right, the answer to that trivia question about the last Giant to win a rushing title is running back Eddie Price, who topped the league way back in 1951. Which just happens to be the year I was born.

That year the 5-11, 190-pound Price led the NFL with 971 yards rushing in 271 carries. He scored seven TDs, all on the ground, in leading the Giants to a 9-2-1 record, just shy of a berth in the NFL championship game.

The highlight of Price’s 1951 season was an 80-yard TD run against the Eagles, sparking a 23-7 Giants win in the next to last game of the season.

In 1950, his rookie season, Price ran for 703 yards in just eight games, which ranked fourth in the league. He missed four games due to injury that year.

Price, a Tulane University product, played his entire career with the Giants, retiring following the 1955 season. He had 3,292 yards rushing and 24 touchdowns in his career, including four scores on pass receptions.

A World War II veteran, Price survived landings at Saipan Leyte, Luzon and Guam.

He planned to go to Notre Dame before World War II, but wound up at Tulane. Perhaps his biggest highlight with the Green Wave was a 103-yard kickoff return that helped Tulane upset Alabama 21-20 in 1947. Tulane later beat the Crimson Tide in the 1948 and 1949 openers.

Tuffy Leemans in 1936 and Bill Paschal in 1943 and 1944 were the only other Giants to win NFL rushing titles.


An open letter to Giants owner John Mara

Dear John,

Please allow me to introduce myself as a lifelong Giants fan. I saw my first game at Yankee Stadium in November of 1963, five days before President Kennedy’s assassination. And I’ve been rooting for the Giants ever since, in good times and bad.

I rejoiced in the four Super Bowl championships, each of which has a special meaning for me. I witnessed the on-field exploits of so many great Giants, from Y.A. Tittle, Frank Gifford and Sam Huff to Lawrence Taylor, Phil Simms, Michael Strahan and so many others.

And I survived the bad times, including the “Goodbye Ali” days, the fumble and those long playoff droughts. Good and bad, I’ve been there every Sunday for more than 50 years.

All of which brings me to the benching of Eli Manning. To say this was handled poorly is a gross understatement. The release of Simms a quarter century ago pales in comparison.

Given, the Giants need to look at the other quarterbacks on the roster to plan for the future.

But there’s got to be a better way to inform a franchise icon and the best QB in Giants history that he’s heading to the bench. It makes it sound like Eli is the reason the team is 2-9 – not the porous offensive line, the lack of talent at wide receiver and the lackluster running game. Heck, not even Tom Brady could succeed with this bunch. Eli Manning is the least of your problems.

The optics are terrible. Even though his eyes were watering and his lips quivering, Eli took the news with class. Ben McAdoo, on the other hand, failed to understand the magnitude of this decision, and his demeanor while making the announcement was detached and unemotional.

Let’s place the blame squarely where it belongs. Besides being a terrible communicator, McAdoo can’t coach or put together a game plan. And Jerry Reese can’t evaluate talent, based on most of his recent draft picks, or build a winning team.

As an organization, the Giants blew this one big time. And the fan base, media and football world seem to be in near universal agreement that this could have been handled differently.

I’m sure the message will ring loud and clear during the final three games with boos, plenty of empty seats and lots of Cowboys, Eagles and Redskins fans in the stands.

Mr. Mara, it’s time to clean house. Ben & Jerry must go. There’s no other way.

Sincerely,

Rick Bause

Loyal Giants fan, SportsLifer blogger and Iona Prep Class of ‘69 grad


Big Blue blues: Once-proud Giants bottom out

Oct 6, 2013; East Rutherford, NJ, USA; A fan of the New York Giants reacts during the game against the Philadelphia Eagles at MetLife Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Robert Deutsch-USA TODAY Sports

Before the 2017 season, the New York Football Giants were being touted as the team to beat in the NFC East. Some of the experts went a step further, writing Big Blue a ticket to the Super Bowl. Yet last than halfway through the year, it’s all come tumbling down.

Forget about contending for a title. These Giants are an embarrassment, bottoming out with new lows in team history. Both head coach Ben McAdoo and general manager Jerry Reese will take a fall in all likelihood. Players are already turning mutinous. A once-proud franchise has bottomed out.

The last time the Giants lost their first four home games and started a season 1-7 was 1980. That year the Giants finished 4-12, but help was on the way in the person of linebacker Lawrence Taylor, the second overall pick in the draft.

This Giants team, a two-point underdog to the winless 49ers on Sunday, is threatening to finish with the worst overall record in team history. In 1966, the Giants were 1-12-1 under coach Allie Sherman, a mere three years after losing the NFL championship game to the Bears.

Other bad finishes included 2-12 in 1974, 2-11-1 in 1973, 2-10-2 in 1964, 2-8-2 in 1947, and 3-11 in 1976, the team’s first year in Giants Stadium. The Giants were 3-12-1 in coach Bill Parcells’ first year (1983) and 4-12 in coach Jim Fassel’s final year (2003).

Victimized at home

Wait, it gets worse. Last week’s 51-17 loss to the Rams marked the most points the Giants surrendered in a home game since 1964.

On a cold, rainy Saturday afternoon nearly 53 years ago, the Cleveland Browns destroyed the Giants 52-20 at Yankee Stadium. Quarterback Frank Ryan tossed five touchdown passes for the Browns that day. Cleveland went on to win its last NFL championship a couple of weeks later, blanking the Baltimore Colts 27-0.

Back-up quarterback Gary Woods, replacing Y.A. Tittle, threw a pair of TDs to tight end Aaron Thomas for Big Blue in the fourth quarter to make the final score more respectable.

I remember listening to the game on radio that day while helping my father make lasagna. The NFL blacked out home games in 1964, which was probably a good thing – at least we didn’t have to watch.

The Giants record for most points given up in a home game took place in 1948 in a 63-35 loss to the Chicago Cardinals at the Polo Grounds. The Giants also lost 56-7 to the Bears in 1943, and 52-27 to the Rams in 1948, both at home.

Big Blue Bummers: 20 worst losses in Giants history