Dr. Bobby Brown ranks as all-time batting leader with .439 lifetime postseason average

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The all-time playoff batting leader is a 92-year-old retired cardiologist and former president of the American League and the Texas Rangers who played his last game more than 62 years ago. Robert William Brown, aka Bobby and the Doctor, spent his short career with the Yankees, played for five World Series champions and batted .439 in the World Series, the all-time best amongst players who have at least 40 postseason plate appearances.

Brown spent eight seasons with the Yankees before retiring in 1954 at the age of 29. The left-hand hitting Brown played both shortstop and third base for New York and would up a solid .279 career hitter. But it was in the postseason that Bobby Brown shined.

In 1947, Brown hit .300 in 69 games, and played a key role when the Yankees beat the Brooklyn Dodgers in a seven-game World Series. Brown, just 22 at the time, pinch-hit four times and he came through with two doubles, a single and a walk. His double in the fourth inning of Game Seven tied the score and sent the eventual winning run to third base.

In the 1949 World Series, Brown batted .500 with six hits in twelve at-bats, including a double and two triples, and he drove in five runs. The Yankees beat the Dodgers in five games.

Then in 1950, when the Yankees swept the Phillies in the Series, the Doctor went 4-for-12, with a double and a triple.

The next season brought a fourth trip to the World Series for Brown. In five games, he had five hits in 14 at-bats for a .357 average. The Yankees defeated the New York Giants in six games. By age 26, Bobby Brown had four World Series rings.

Brown won a fifth ring with the 1952 Yankees, but before the season ended he was off to Tulane medical school.

Second on the all-time post-season batting list is Colby Rasmus, who played with Houston in 2015 and before that St. Louis in 2009. Although Rasmus never played in a World Series, he compiled a .423 playoff mark.

Pepper Martin of the Gashouse Gang Cardinals, aka the Wild Horse of the Osage, hit .500 in the 1931 World Series and .355 in 1934 to lead St. Louis to a pair of seven-game victories.

Hall of Famers Lou Brock (.391) and Ryan Sandberg (.385) rank eighth and ninth respectively on the top 10 list.

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